Notes from a pilot's kid

Cafes with Wifi in Chengdu

Here are a couple cafe recommendations in Chengdu for people who are looking for good coffee, good wifi, and an environment for working or studying.

The first three are all in a quiet residential neighborhood full of small restaurants, dessert shops, cafes, bars, teahouses, and mahjong rooms. If you go to any of the three and walk around a bit you will surely find more options nearby. The other recommendations are more centrally located (on a subway line) and convenient but don’t feel as independent or cozy.

Taxi Ride Sharing in Guiyang

Night shot of Guiyang Streets

Throughout downtown Guiyang there seem to be people standing everywhere on the edge of the sidewalk or in the curb lane trying to get a ride somewhere. Guiyang does not (yet) have a subway system, and for some reason there’s a severe shortage of available taxis even at non-peak hours. This is not uncommon in China (available taxis can be hard to find in central Chengdu, though in my experience not as hard as Guiyang), but I have not been to another place that handles taxi shortages like Guiyang.

Winter Heating in Southern China

When I told a friend I had arrived in Changsha and began to mention the weather, she shared with me an old joke about winters in Southern China:

南方人说:今天3度好冷。山东人笑了:我们这零下3度。北京人也笑了:我们这零下13度。黑龙江人听到哈哈大笑:我们这零下23度。南方人听完冷笑一声:“我说的是室内。室内!好不好

A southerner said: Today was really cold; the high temperature was three degrees. A man from Shandong heard this and laughed: it was three degrees below zero where I’m from. A man from Beijing also laughed: up here it’s thirteen below. A man from Heilongjiang heard this and laughed even harder: up here it’s twenty-three below. The southerner heard all of this, sneered, and replied: I was talking about indoors. Indoors! Ok?

Film Review - Lost in Beijing (蘋果)

Screenshot from Lost in Beijing

Wikipedia

Banned from Douban Reviews, so no review score

6.8/10 on IMDb

Lost in Beijing is a story that superficially feels like a soap opera; it includes a fight over parental rights, a complicated rape scene, a seemingly endless game of revenge, and a messy love triangle. But this storyline is used by director Li Yu as a canvas for social commentary about modern life in urban China: the way money can dominate love and family, the search for opportunity and pleasure, the divide between rich and poor, and the disregard of individual agency especially for women.

Kill the man from Shijiazhuang (杀死那个石家庄人) - Political Chinese Rock